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Trauma Care


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#1 tom10406

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 01:56 PM

I appologize if this is a dumb question, but I have noticed in some of the photos of wounded in Afghanistan, that the patients are wrapped in a blanket, that looks like it has a foil liner. Being a civilian Paramedic and no military experience, has the military found that preventing heat loss beneficial for tramua patients? We always try to keep patients warm as you can, but I think what is happening is, people might tend to forget that when it is a hot sunny day in July.

Edited by tom10406, 18 May 2013 - 02:41 PM.

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#2 WTFubar

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 11:01 PM

don't know if this is their reasoning.. but here is an interesting read regarding just such a scenario that we should all keep in mind

http://www.emsworld....-triad-of-death
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#3 TheGooseMedic

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 11:16 PM

PHTLS stresses to maintain body heat. Hypothermia can result from loss of energy production with anaerobic metabolism. The studies from the military are showing that even wounded soldiers in the 100+ degree weather are losing body heat so they are wrapping them up for shock treatment and having better outcomes.

And BTW that was a great question. :icon14:
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#4 PSYCtest040

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 06:15 PM

PHTLS stresses to maintain body heat. Hypothermia can result from loss of energy production with anaerobic metabolism. The studies from the military are showing that even wounded soldiers in the 100+ degree weather are losing body heat so they are wrapping them up for shock treatment and having better outcomes.

And BTW that was a great question. :icon14:


Makes sense. I'm by far no expert in trauma care but my treatment's are ABC's, manage injuries, big IV's, titrate fluids to effect, keep em warm and pain management as needed. Plus a diesel bolus to the appropriate facility.
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#5 325

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 07:38 AM

Dead thread resurrection: Lethal triad of trauma=Hypothermia, Acidosis and Coagulopathy. Pet peeve of mine are trauma pt's. that are trauma naked and wheeled into shock trauma with no blankets or mylar foil. I won't even speak on fluids running wide with normotension or uncontrolled bleeding.....

 

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